Get Your Artwork Into After Effects

8:32FreeDone
2

Arranging Your Layers in 3D Space

12:44FreeDone
3

Adding Cameras to Control Perspective

10:41FreeDone
4

Parenting 3D Layers

9:15FreeDone
5

Precomps & Collapsing Transformations

9:45FreeDone
6

Animating Cameras and 3D layers

25:32ProsDone
7

Rendering Settings and Quality

4:08ProsDone
8

And There Was Light

9:52ProsDone
9

More Lights in After Effects

9:26ProsDone
10

Material Options

10:14ProsDone
11

Useful Camera Techniques

8:01ProsDone
12

Rollercoaster Cameras and Auto-Orientation

9:28ProsDone
13

Multiple Camera Angles & Transitions

11:56ProsDone
14

Make Better Stuff Faster

7:03FreeDone
15

Flickering Layer Issue

11:45FreeDone
16

Make a Cube

5:15FreeDone

Get Your Artwork Into After Effects

Published by Rich Armstrong

Episode Notes

Extra tips from the author

The 2.5D Stage

I like to compare creating 3D animations in After Effects to creating a production on stage. It has some real world elements, but it’s not the real world. And the cool thing is, no one expects it to be the real world. So what is your audience after? Well, they want to be enthralled. By visuals. By story. By emotion. By movement. Even with information. You want your audience to be drawn in. And you don’t have to learn how to use 3D software or direct blockbusters to do this.

Animating elements made in Illustrator and Photoshop can really be playing to your strengths, if you’re comfortable with Illustrator and Photoshop of course. All you have to do is import your 2D elements into After Effects, and move them around in a 3D space. Many people call this 2.5D – think of each layer as a stiff piece of card that you can move, rotate and scale in space.

Episode Topics: